The Convenia Antibiotic Injection
and other medications to beware of

We recommend you do extensive research online before allowing a vet to give your cat or dog this shot. Many animals have died from it. Remember there always alternatives. Never make risky decisions in haste.

Please read the info below and also an
article by Lisa A. Pierson, DVM

PRECAUTIONS

Prescribing antibacterial drugs in the absence of a proven or strongly suspected bacterial infection is unlikely to provide benefit to treated animals and may increase the risk of the development of drug-resistant animal pathogens. SO MAKE SURE YOU ACTUALLY SEE NECROSIS DEVELOPING AND THIS CAN BE VERIFIED 12 HOURS AFTER SUCH INJURY WOUND TO THE CANINE OR FELINE.

The safe use of CONVENIA in dogs or cats less than 4 months of age (see Animal Safety) and in breeding or lactating animals has not been determined.

Safety has not been established for IM or IV administration. The long-term effects on injection sites have not been determined.


CONVENIA is slowly eliminated from the body, approximately 65 days is needed to eliminate 97% of the administered dose from the body. Animals experiencing an adverse reaction may need to be monitored for this duration.

CONVENIA has been shown in an experimental in vitro system to result in an increase in free concentrations of carprofen, furosemide, doxycycline, and ketoconazole. Concurrent use of these or other drugs that have a high degree of protein-binding (e.g. NSAIDs, propofol, cardiac, anticonvulsant, and behavioral medications) may compete with cefovecin-binding and cause adverse reactions.


Positive direct Coombs' test results and false positive reactions for glucose in the urine have been reported during treatment with some cephalosporin antimicrobials. Cephalosporin antimicrobials may also cause falsely elevated urine protein determinations. Some antimicrobials, including cephalosporins, can cause lowered albumin values due to interference with certain testing methods.

Occasionally, cephalosporins and NSAIDs have been associated with myelotoxicity, thereby creating a toxic neutropenia4. Other hematological reactions seen with cephalosporins include neutropenia, anemia, hypoprothrombinemia, thrombocytopenia, prolonged prothrombin time (PT) and partial thromboplastin time (PTT), platelet dysfunction and transient increases in serum aminotransferases.

THIS IS WHY I SAID GIVE HALF DOSE THAN WHAT IS WRITTEN HERE

Adverse Reactions:

Dogs

A total of 320 dogs, ranging in age from 8 weeks to 19 years, were included in a field study safety analysis. Adverse reactions reported in dogs treated with CONVENIA and the active control are summarized in Table 2.

Table 2: Number Of Dogs* With Adverse Reactions Reported During The Field Study With Convenia.
Adverse Reaction
CONVENIA (n=157)
Active Control (n=163)

Lethargy
2 out of 7 dogs

Anorexia/Decreased Appetite
5 out of 8 dogs <<< High probability.

Vomiting
6 out of 12 dogs <<<
About 50% will experience this reaction

Diarrhea
6 out of 7 dogs <<<<<< Very high probability on Canines.

Blood in Feces
1 out of 2 dogs <<< very remote -----------------------
ARE THEY KIDDING????????????????????

Dehydration
0 out of 1 dog <<<< Very remote

Flatulence
1 of 0 dogs <<<<< very remote

Increased Borborygmi
1 out of 0 dogs <<<<< very remote


*Some dogs may have experienced more than one adverse reaction or more than one occurrence of the same adverse reaction during the study.

Mild to moderate elevations in serum γ-glutamyl transferase or serum alanine aminotransferase were noted post-treatment in several of the CONVENIA-treated dogs. No clinical abnormalities were noted with these findings.

One CONVENIA-treated dog in a separate field study experienced diarrhea post-treatment lasting 4 weeks. The diarrhea resolved.

Cats

A total of 291 cats, ranging in age from 2.4 months (1 cat) to 21 years, were included in the field study safety analysis. Adverse reactions reported in cats treated with CONVENIA and the active control are summarized in Table 3.

Table 3: Number Of Cats* With Adverse Reactions Reported During The Field Study With Convenia.
Adverse Reaction
CONVENIA (n=147)
Active Control (n=144)

Vomiting
10 out of 14 cats <<<< Very high probability to common

Diarrhea
7 out of 26 cats <<< about 25% probability

Anorexia/Decreased Appetite
6 out of 6 cats <<<<<< Absolutely definite decrease in appetite.

Lethargy
6 out of 6 cats <<<< Absolutely will have it.

Hyper/Acting Strange
1 of 1 cats <<<<< Might get it.

Inappropriate Urination
1 out of 0 cats <<<< Very remote


*Some cats may have experienced more than one adverse reaction or more than one occurrence of the same adverse reaction during the study.

Four CONVENIA cases had mildly elevated post-study ALT (1 case was elevated pre-study). No clinical abnormalities were noted with these findings.

Twenty-four CONVENIA cases had normal pre-study BUN values and elevated post-study BUN values (37 - 39 mg/dL post-study). There were 6 CONVENIA cases with normal pre- and mildly to moderately elevated post-study creatinine values. Two of these cases also had an elevated post-study BUN. No clinical abnormalities were noted with these findings.

One CONVENIA-treated cat in a separate field study experienced diarrhea post-treatment lasting 42 days. The diarrhea resolved.

Foreign Market Experience:: TAKE SPECIAL NOTICE HERE

The following adverse events were reported voluntarily during post-approval use of the product in dogs and cats in foreign markets:
death, tremors/ataxia, seizures, anaphylaxis, acute pulmonary edema, facial edema, injection site reactions (alopecia, scabs, necrosis, and erythema), hemolytic anemia, salivation, pruritus, lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and inappetance.

Clinical Pharmacology:

Pharmacokinetics:

Cefovecin is rapidly and completely absorbed following subcutaneous administration. Non-linear kinetics is exhibited (plasma concentrations do not increase proportionally with dose). Cefovecin does not undergo hepatic metabolism and the majority of a dose is excreted unchanged in the urine. Elimination also occurs from excretion of unchanged drug in the bile. Cefovecin is a highly protein-bound molecule in dog plasma (98.5%) and cat plasma (99.8%) and may compete with other highly protein-bound drugs for plasma protein-binding sites that could result in transient, higher free drug concentrations of either compound. Pharmacokinetic parameters following subcutaneous dosing at 8 mg/kg in the dog and cat are summarized in Table 4.

BELOW IS FOR VET INFORMATION

Table 4: Pharmacokinetic Parameters Reflecting Total Drug Concentrations In Plasma (mean ± Standard Deviation Or Range) Following An 8 Mg/kg Intravenous Or Subcutaneous Dose Of Cefovecin In Dogs And Cats.
Parameter Mean ± Sd1 Or (range)
Dogs Cats

For A Copy Of The Material Safety Data Sheet (msds) Or To Report A Suspected Adverse Reaction Call Pfizer Animal Health At 1-800-366-5288.

This drug stays in the body for 65 days.

Facebook group discussing this topic:
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Convenia-adverse-reactions-in-catsfelines-and-dogscanines/118697391502152

Please educate yourself so you will know what questions to ask (and learn the possible adverse side effects to watch for)  if your veterinarian wants to prescribe this drug to your beloved pet.  Convenia - (convenience?) may not be so convenient.
 
http://www.catinfo.org/?link=convenia
 
http://www.livestrong.com/article/249522-side-effects-of-convenia/
 
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Convenia-adverse-reactions-in-catsfelines-and-dogscanines/118697391502152
 
Remember Pfizer's "slick" advertising campaign in early 1997 when introducing Rimadyl??? 
 
See: 
http://www.healthyhappydogs.com/RimadylOrGlucosamine

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